Skip to Main Content

Stuber, Matt

Matt Stuber holding a hatch-year northern goshawk captured and banded at the Intermountain Bird Observatory's Lucky Peak Field Station, just outside of Boise, ID

Matt Stuber holding a hatch-year northern goshawk captured and banded at the Intermountain Bird Observatory’s Lucky Peak Field Station, just outside of Boise, ID

Matt received his M.S. in Raptor Biology from Boise State University in 2015.  He studied the exposure to and effects of pesticides on burrowing owls in the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area.

Thesis Abstract

Full-Text Thesis

Matt finished his field work and classes at Boise State in the fall of 2008.  In the spring of 2009, he was hired by the Idaho Bird Observatory (now Boise State’s Intermountain Bird Observatory) to conduct flammulated owl surveys in southern Idaho and to trap raptors at their Lucky Peak Field Station in the fall.

Matt holding a hatch-year golden eagle captured and banded at the Intermountain Bird Observatory's Lucky Peak Field Station, just outside of Boise, ID

Matt holding a hatch-year golden eagle captured and banded at the Intermountain Bird Observatory’s Lucky Peak Field Station, just outside of Boise, ID

In November 2009, Matt was hired by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as a wildlife biologist in East Lansing, Michigan.  Matt’s primary duty there was to manage bald eagle populations in the Midwest and help people avoid and minimize disturbance of bald eagle nests where eagle and human interests overlapped.  Matt was also involved in bald eagle research each summer, partnering with the University of Maryland and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources on separate eagle contaminants studies in the Midwest, and spent several months helping with the clean-up of the Enbridge Oil Spill on the Kalamazoo River.

Two 4-week old bald eagle nestlings at a nest in Jackson, Michigan

Two 4-week old bald eagle nestlings at a nest in Jackson, Michigan

In 2012, Matt moved back to Boise, taking a new position with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service working on the conservation of and determining the ESA status for Woodland Caribou in the United States.  In 2013, Matt’s role switched back to eagle management, and he was hired as the Pacific Region’s eagle coordinator.  In this role, Matt oversees and participates in federal bald and golden eagle and migratory bird management in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington.  One of Matt’s primary duties is to work with renewable energy developers in the Pacific Northwest to avoid, minimize, and mitigate for their impacts to bald and golden eagles and other migratory birds.

A 3-week old golden eagle nestling at a nest near Christmas Valley, OR

A 3-week old golden eagle nestling at a nest near Christmas Valley, OR

Since graduation, Matt has participated in several long-term raptor research partnerships in and around his Master’s research stomping grounds – the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area (NCA). Through a partnership with the Idaho BLM and the USGS, Matt currently assists the BLM with management, monitoring, and research of western screech owls and ferruginous hawks in the NCA. Through another partnership with the Idaho National Guard, the USGS, and the BLM, Matt also is helping to conduct research on ferruginous hawk movement and habitat use in the NCA and on migration. Outside of Idaho, Matt leads a nest box program for western screech owls and American kestrels in the Willamette Valley, OR, and continues to participate annually in bald eagle contaminant research in his home state of Wisconsin, in partnership with the Wisconsin DNR. Matt also currently serves on the Raptor Research Foundation’s Early Career Raptor Researcher committee.

Matt holding a 5-week old golden eagle nestling at a nest near Summer Lake, OR - as part of a research project studying exposure of nestling golden eagles to lead

Matt holding a 5-week old golden eagle nestling at a nest near Summer Lake, OR – as part of a research project studying exposure of nestling golden eagles to lead

 

 

Publications since Boise State University Graduate School:

Miller, R. A., N. Paprocki, M. J. Stuber, C. E. Moulton and J. D. Carlisle. 2016. Short-eared Owl (Asio flammeus) surveys in the North American Intermountain West: utilizing citizen scientists to conduct monitoring across a broad geographic scale. Avian Conservation and Ecology 11 (1):3. [online] URL:  http://www.ace-eco.org/vol11/iss1/art3/